Saturday, June 27, 2015

POWER LINE PERCHERS







We moved back to Kureelpa, a rural location in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, late last year, just down the road from the house where I first started my blog nearly five years ago. http://qldbirder.blogspot.com.au/2010/10/backyard-pics.html

The views are similar and the birds are familiar, like old friends we just haven't seen for a while.



View from patio


There are some power lines that run along a road easement opposite our back patio, a favourite hangout for the locals. Pale-headed Rosellas often land with a chatter and flash of colours, but they are flighty and don't hang around for long. 



Pale-headed Rosella




P.H. Rosellas - immature on right




P.H. Rosella - immature



The biggest honeyeater in the neighbourhood the Blue-faced, uses its perch to check for rival species encroaching on favourite feeding trees.   



Blue-faced Honeyeater




Our biggest kingfisher is intent on finding prey in the paddock below and doesn't concern itself with chasing off competitors.




Laughing Kookaburra




And one of our largest pigeons drops in occasionally, often during showery weather for some reason.



White-headed Pigeon



A pigeon pair




A convenient place to munch on a mantis for this young cuckoo-shrike.



Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike - immature




A butcherbird gamely balances on one leg, with the other out of action through injury. 



Pied Butcherbird




This male Magpie-lark was taking a breather, after earlier being involved in an antiphonal duet with his partner. She was on the verandah rail doing the same.
  


Magpie-lark - male




Magpie-lark - female





A couple of immature Australian Magpies preferred the fence posts, another favourite perch for many, while engaging in some warble and natter.



Australian Magpie




Another patio view




Pacific dawn 








Cheers & Happy Birding





4 comments:

  1. Fabulous view! I hope you are enjoying your new place to call home. The local environmental education centre here is also called Amaroo.

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  2. Yes Judith, the outlook is something we never tire of. The bird list is pretty impressive too with nearly 97 species so far.

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